Fuck Yeah Norse Mythology

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folk stories, heroic sagas, living religion

fictorvm:

Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, before the encounter with Fenriris identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th-century Icelandic manuscript.
Norse god Týr. Corresponding names in other Germanic languages are Gothic Teiws, Old English Tīw and Old High German Ziu and Cyo, all from Proto-Germanic *Tīwaz. The Latinised name is Tius or Tio.
In the late Icelandic Eddas, Tyr is portrayed, alternately, as the son of Odin (Prose Edda) or of Hymir (Poetic Edda), while the origins of his name and his possible relationship to Tuisto (see Tacitus' Germania) suggest he was once considered the father of the gods and head of the pantheon, since his name is ultimately cognate to that of *Dyeus (cf. Dyaus), the reconstructed chief deity in Indo-European religion. 

fictorvm:

Týr, depicted here with both hands intact, before the encounter with Fenriris identified with Mars in this illustration from an 18th-century Icelandic manuscript.

Norse god Týr. Corresponding names in other Germanic languages are Gothic Teiws, Old English Tīw and Old High German Ziu and Cyo, all from Proto-Germanic *Tīwaz. The Latinised name is Tius or Tio.

In the late Icelandic Eddas, Tyr is portrayed, alternately, as the son of Odin (Prose Edda) or of Hymir (Poetic Edda), while the origins of his name and his possible relationship to Tuisto (see TacitusGermania) suggest he was once considered the father of the gods and head of the pantheon, since his name is ultimately cognate to that of *Dyeus (cf. Dyaus), the reconstructed chief deity in Indo-European religion

— 5 hours ago with 46 notes
#Art  #Tyr  #Nordic  #Viking 

lyndseyhale:

Having broken my right index finger a few weeks ago, I am having a break form paper cutting. Surprisingly I am still able to draw (all be it a little slower), so heres a sneak peak of a drawing, Ode to Odin

— 13 hours ago with 69 notes
#Huginn and Muninn  #Odinn  #Art  #Reblogged from the Artist  #Norse Mythology 

mynamesredacted:

How did Sleipnir end up with 8 legs?

he must have thought

well my dad has 4 legs

and my mom has 2 legs

and 4 times 2 is 8

so I should have 8 legs

because that’s how biology works

hurr durr

— 21 hours ago with 52 notes
#Just for Fun  #Sleipnir  #Norse Mythology  #Nordic  #Viking 
Current Follower Count is 4,890

At 5,000 followers, I will host a tumblr giveaway. It will be a reblog/like to enter giveaway, and I will generate a random number to decide the winner. I will not be making the post detailing the rules and prizes until we’ve officially hit 5k followers. 

However, I am curious about what sort of prizes you would like to see. I have purchased a really beautiful, illustrated copy of a retelling of the norse myths, but I don’t have much money to buy other things. 

If anyone would like to donate something, art or things they have sitting around their home, I would be very appreciative. Anything goes, really. If you have something you want to donate, just drop me a message!

— 22 hours ago with 13 notes
#Giveaway  #Administration  #Donations 
Anonymous asked: What I would really like is a decent book/ paper the covers each of the different styles of Viking art, tools they used, etc. Something that really delves into the material lives of the Vikings. You gotta link to such a thing? Much appreciated, thanks.


Answer:

Sorry it took me so long to get back to you. I was waiting on a response from some of my contacts about it. The only book I can recommend that might be close to what you want is Die Wikingezeit Gotlands by Lena Thunmark-Nylén. The book is in German, and is a collection of books detailing the archaeological material culture in Gotland. 

Gotland, although being culturally unique in many ways, is the principle source of both silver hoards and picture stones, and thus is often taken as a good source of Viking Age material. Although the text is in German, it has many good quality, full color photographs and professional technical drawings of artifacts, arranged chronologically. We had one at the archaeological site for visual reference of artifacts we found. 

It includes weaponry, jewelry and tools at the very minimum, but it may be difficult to find. I hope this helps. 

— 3 days ago with 4 notes
#Resources  #Gotland  #Archaeology  #History  #Viking Age  #Anonymous 
End of Queue

This post is to mark the end of the queue. If it has been posted, than I offer my sincere apologies. I usually try to keep up a rather lengthy queue of materials for you, but life rather gets away from me sometimes. 

Want to see more material? 

Encourage people to submit! I often depend on submissions in order to deliver really excellent content. 

I am also accepting guest articles either of your own topic, or one of the ones from my to-do list. 

— 4 days ago with 4 notes
#Administration 
Poetic Edda Read Along – Havamal Part 1

Havamal is very long. I have therefor cut the article into two parts. The part on Lodfafnir will appear next.

For this read along series I am using Carolyne Larrington’s translation, as that is the copy that I own. Those of you following at home may have a different translation and therefore some details may be different.

Previous Poem: Voluspa

Havamal is poem that is best seen as a compilation of several poems united by theme, rather than a single poem in and of itself. Whether Havamal was compiled by the unknown author of *R, or it was simply transcribed from an earlier compilation, we cannot say. Because of the mish-mashed nature of the poem, and it’s incredible length, it has been separated into 4 sections for the following analysis.

The poem is generally united by the themes of social expectations and codes, and Odinn’s wisdom. There are multiple places where it seems that pairs of stanzas from other, unknown poems were inserted due to their thematic content. It is not unusual when reading Havamal to come across a series of stanzas that repeat a key, unifying phrase that is not seen in any other location of the poem. Having each stanza begin the same way is something that we see in other poem sections which likely came from a single poem (notably the Loddfafnir section) and it seems likely that the layout and style of these wisdom poems was somewhat consistent. Poems were likely chosen for compilation not only because of their thematic content, but also because of their poetic style.

The first section is the largest, most random section. It is a collection of random stanzas from what appears to be many different poems, pulled together into thematic groups. It opens up with a few stanzas about hosting and being a good guest (a theme which re-occurs several times in this section.)

This large section opens the poem with a stanza that feels out of place and reflects a great kind of paranoia, warning the reader to beware of their surroundings. It is a very strange and distrustful way to open a poem whose biggest section is about social graces.

Stanzas 2-5 feel much more natural, and indeed the enthusiastic opening of stanza 2 (“Blessed be the givers!”) seems to fit much better with the theme that follows through the rest of the section. Stanzas 10 and 11 match each other, and seem to not quite fit the themes of what came before, focusing on travel wisdom, rather than guest etiquette. It seems likely that these were inserted here in order to provide a transition to the section beginning with stanza 12 about alcohol. However, the transition is clumsy and it seems clear that these stanzas don’t belong to this poem.

The entire first section continues in this way, with groups of two to three stanzas at a time seeming to come from the same poems, thrown together in thematic sections. This is a very weird way to consolidate lore, and it seems like the original compiler was trying to preserve the most important parts of the wisdom poems in a single document- though why they would break it up into pieces and reorganize it, rather than making a long document that recorded all of them, is far less clear.

I attempted to determine how many poems are represented in this first section, but with the information available to me it is almost impossible to tell, and I do not have the knowledge to be able to parse out the original stanzas to try to detect poetic patterns that represent a unified section. I must rely on the translation. Grouping stanzas into those which obviously belong together (share repeated phases), I assumed the remaining filler in between each section attributed to a single poem, though likely it does not since they are extreme disjointed. None the less, using this method I separated out a minimum of 46 poems contributing to Havamal before the section with Loddfafnir.

The last few poems in this list are actually substantial sections and not fragmented, and therefore I will devote most of my attention to them.

The first section of this kind begins with stanza 96, marked by a switch to the first person that is sustained for several stanzas. The narrator is identified through dialog as Odinn. The story in this section is not attested in any other document, and chronicles the story of him attempting to win over the heart and body of Billing’s daughter (who is not named.) The clever woman outsmarts him by telling him to return in the evening, and tying a dog to her bed in her place. Thus Odinn was humiliated and did not win the woman. This is an episode that is not often talked about mythological discussion.

The second substantial poem insert begins at stanza 104, where we see Odinn in first person recalling the events leading up to his taking the Mead of Poetry. He summarizes his seduction of Gunnlod and how she helped him to escape with the mead, but expresses some weight of conscience for using her in such a manner. Rather interestingly, Odinn both describes her in a poor light, “a cheaply bought beauty” and in a positive one, “that good woman.” He reflects that without her help he never would have succeeded in taking the mead, and that he did not pay her back appropriately for her dead but instead used her and left her heavy-hearted.

The stanza immediately following this section (109) begins, “The next day the frost-giants went to ask for the High One’s advice, in the High One’s hall.” Although this seems to be a continuation of the previous narrative, it is clear that it is not, and is instead a section taken from a different poem, It is this stanza that marks the beginning of Loddfafnir. 

— 4 days ago with 18 notes
#Poetic Edda  #Read Along  #Havamal  #Norse Mythology  #Odinn 

anlinndubh:

The son of Earth (pt.2) hidden knowledge in Norse myths pt.20 by Ladyofthe Labyrinth on youtube.

I can’t reccomend her videos more highly, but this particular one has some interesting information regarding gender roles, homosexuality and trans people in the Viking Age.

— 4 days ago with 31 notes
#Norse Mythology  #Poetic Edda  #Thor  #Video