Fuck Yeah Norse Mythology

Ask   Submit   Resources   About and FAQ   Tags   

folk stories, heroic sagas, living religion

Mysterious Viking Sword Made With Technology From the Future?

ancientorigins:

image

The Viking sword Ulfberht was made of metal so pure it baffled archaeologists. It was thought the technology to forge such metal was not invented for another 800 or more years.

Read more …

— 2 weeks ago with 476 notes
#Not Mythology  #Ulfberht  #Documentary  #Queue 
fuckyeahpaganism:

In Norse mythology, Huginn (“thought”) Muninn (“memory”) are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, to bring information to the god Odin. In the Poetic Edda, a disguised Odin expresses that he fears that they may not return from their daily flights. The Prose Edda explains that Odin is referred to as “raven-god” due to his association with Huginn and Muninn, who are described as perching on his shoulders. Odin also gave the ravens the ability to speak.
(x)

fuckyeahpaganism:

In Norse mythology, Huginn (“thought”) Muninn (“memory”) are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, to bring information to the god Odin. In the Poetic Edda, a disguised Odin expresses that he fears that they may not return from their daily flights. The Prose Edda explains that Odin is referred to as “raven-god” due to his association with Huginn and Muninn, who are described as perching on his shoulders. Odin also gave the ravens the ability to speak.

(x)

— 2 weeks ago with 3269 notes
#Odinn  #Art  #Queue  #Huginn and Munnin 

havoc305:

My Favorite God/giant from Norse mythology. Fenrir. Son of Loki and destined to kill Odin during Ragnorok. So powerful he was captured but was tricked into it because no God was able to stand up to him. Gotta love that.

— 2 weeks ago with 1813 notes
#Art  #Queue  #Fenrir 
Call for Submissions →

fuckyeahnorsemythology:

So the last mod did not leave me with any kind of queue of material. As I am only one person who also runs several other blogs here on tumblr, I need to develop a substantial queue to keep this going in between my original posts and articles.

Therefore, I’m putting out the call for submissions….

Reposting this because I still need submissions. 

I very badly need to set up a long queue, since my goal is have it publish 5 times a day. I go through material fast. 

I am accepting anything that fits the criteria above. Content wise articles, art, links, book reviews, anything you think of is accepted.

— 2 weeks ago with 12 notes
#Submissions  #Help 
Norwegian Rune Poem

English translation sourced from Ragweed Forge. Original Norwegian here.

  1. Wealth is a source of discord among kinsmen;
    the wolf lives in the forest.
  2. Dross comes from bad iron;
    the reindeer often races over the frozen snow.
  3. Giant causes anguish to women;
    misfortune makes few men cheerful.
  4. Estuary is the way of most journeys;
    but a scabbard is of swords.
  5. Riding is said to be the worst thing for horses;
    Reginn forged the finest sword.
  6. Ulcer is fatal to children;
    death makes a corpse pale.
  7. Hail is the coldest of grain;
    Christ created the world of old.
  8. Constraint gives scant choice;
    a naked man is chilled by the frost.
  9. Ice we call the broad bridge;
    the blind man must be led.
  10. Plenty is a boon to men;
    I say that Frothi was generous.
  11. Sun is the light of the world;
    I bow to the divine decree.
  12. Tyr is a one-handed god;
    often has the smith to blow.
  13. Birch has the greenest leaves of any shrub;
    Loki was fortunate in his deceit.
  14. Man is an augmentation of the dust;
    great is the claw of the hawk.
  15. A waterfall is a River which falls from a mountain-side;
    but ornaments are of gold.
  16. Yew is the greenest of trees in winter;
    it is wont to crackle when it burns.
— 2 weeks ago with 39 notes
#Norwegian Rune Poem  #Elder Futhark  #Runes  #Queue 
talesoffjords:

Erik the Red, Greenland and Iceland:

Erik the Red was an icelandic born viking explorer, who found Greenland and settled the huge island. At first, Norwegians had explored and settled Iceland. This name of course comes from the many glaciers and icy beaches, even though the area were way warmer than today, and was covered in 80% forests compared to the 10% today.
Erik the Red found Greenland with a crew, sailed back to Iceland to gain more settlers for the new land. He didn’t succeed so he had to lie about it, calling it Greenland for making it sound more appealing even though it was colder and further north than Iceland.
Erik then found several cities, and one of theese (Ruins pictured) stood on Greenland till 1500 totally isolated from the rest of Europe. Greenland was rediscovered by Danish missionaries in the 1700’s.(Accidentally posted this on my private blog, re-posting it here.)

talesoffjords:

Erik the Red, Greenland and Iceland:

Erik the Red was an icelandic born viking explorer, who found Greenland and settled the huge island.
At first, Norwegians had explored and settled Iceland. This name of course comes from the many glaciers and icy beaches, even though the area were way warmer than today, and was covered in 80% forests compared to the 10% today.

Erik the Red found Greenland with a crew, sailed back to Iceland to gain more settlers for the new land. He didn’t succeed so he had to lie about it, calling it Greenland for making it sound more appealing even though it was colder and further north than Iceland.

Erik then found several cities, and one of theese (Ruins pictured) stood on Greenland till 1500 totally isolated from the rest of Europe. Greenland was rediscovered by Danish missionaries in the 1700’s.

(Accidentally posted this on my private blog, re-posting it here.)

— 2 weeks ago with 705 notes
#History  #Not Mythology 
I couldn’t find an image source for this. If anyone knows it let me know and I’ll edit in a link here.

I couldn’t find an image source for this. If anyone knows it let me know and I’ll edit in a link here.

(Source: vikings-brasil)

— 3 weeks ago with 169 notes
#Art  #Longships 
Click here to support Goatyfuntimes by anlinndubh 1 →

sigynsdottir:

hangedwoman:

anlinndubh:

Hey guys I just set up the page for goatyfuntimes, which is a group devotional offering to Thor. I’m going to let it run until next Friday, that is Friday the 15th, then use whatever is raised to donate to Bóthar and close the page.

This is amazing!

Thanks for setting it up! Have a thing followers, please signal boost to more Heathens.

— 3 weeks ago with 43 notes
#Not Mythology  #Thor  #Heathen 
Anonymous asked: Do you know if the practitioners of Norse mythology had some sort of religious sacrament? Also do you know what is the afterlife of those who don't die in battle?


Answer:

Modern practitioners generally observe rituals called blots. Some people do daily blots to the specific gods they honor the most, including myself. Others observe blots on particular holidays. The two most common holidays are Midsummer and Jul, as these are the best attested in the old material, but there are many others someone may choose to observe as well, including some modern ones. 

Afterlife in norse mythology is a complex thing. For one, the concept of what call a “soul” in english is very different in old norse sources. There are many pieces that make up what might be called a soul (I unfortunately do not have my books in front of me to go into this in depth, since I am out of my home country at the moment. Sorry.) Different things happen to the different pieces, and some remnant of the person may travel to an afterlife. 

Of course Valhalla is the most famous, but Freyja takes the first half of all the soldiers who die in battle to her own hall for the afterlife. I have heard that some other gods and goddesses may take the souls of the dead as well in certain circumstances, but I’ve never actually read this in the primary material, so I’m not certain where the idea comes from. 

There are ghosts, especially in the later sagas, and a tradition that if a man is beheaded, his spirit remains in his head until it is united with his body again and pass on. There are also some folk creatures (though not strictly mythological) such as ghasts which indicate the fates of some people after death. 

Finally there is Helheim, which is often treated as a ‘catch-all’ for those who do not fall into any of the above catagories. 

I may make a better researched version of this post later, when I have my books in front of me. :)

— 3 weeks ago with 7 notes
#QandA  #Heathen